Cardiology Research and Practice

Pregnancy Complications and Developmental Programming of Cardiovascular Dysfunction in Offspring


Publishing date
01 Jul 2019
Status
Closed
Submission deadline
08 Mar 2019

Lead Editor

1Tulane University, New Orleans, USA

2University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, USA

3University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA

This issue is now closed for submissions.
More articles will be published in the near future.

Pregnancy Complications and Developmental Programming of Cardiovascular Dysfunction in Offspring

This issue is now closed for submissions.
More articles will be published in the near future.

Description

It is now well established that events occurring during early life can also impact on long-term cardiovascular health in at-risk offspring. Poor pregnancy conditions such as preeclampsia, adverse diet, obesity, stress, age, or infection can lead to permanent adverse consequences, life-long blood pressure control, and cardiovascular diseases not only in the mother but also in her offspring. Although these associations are becoming clear, less is known about the mechanisms linking pre- and postnatal environment to changes in long-term cardiovascular regulation.

In this special issue we invite authors to submit original research articles related to pregnancy complications and developmental programming of cardiovascular dysfunction in offspring. Both human and animal studies directed at examining mechanisms mediating pregnancy complications and developmental programming of cardiovascular diseases are encouraged.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Pregnancy complications related to hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, including preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, or chronic hypertension
  • Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of maternal hypertensive disorders in humans and animal models
  • Impact of adverse perinatal conditions, such as maternal stress, unhealthy diet, or proinflammatory factors on cardiovascular function in mother or offspring
  • Cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the developmental programming of high blood pressure and cardiac dysfunction in humans and animals
Cardiology Research and Practice
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate26%
Submission to final decision97 days
Acceptance to publication40 days
CiteScore1.970
Impact Factor2.140
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