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Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society
Volume 2015, Article ID 213204, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/213204
Research Article

A Modified Cellular Automaton Approach for Mixed Bicycle Traffic Flow Modeling

1Key Laboratory of Road and Traffic Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tongji University, 4800 Cao’an Road, Shanghai 201804, China
2School of Transportation, Southeast University, 2 Sipailou, Nanjing 210096, China

Received 19 March 2015; Accepted 25 June 2015

Academic Editor: Gabriella Bretti

Copyright © 2015 Xiaonian Shan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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