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Discrete Dynamics in Nature and Society
Volume 2015, Article ID 583819, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/583819
Research Article

Spatial Spread of Tuberculosis through Neighborhoods Segregated by Socioeconomic Position: A Stochastic Automata Model

1Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Medical School Office Building, 251 Campus Drive, Room X3c46, MC5411, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
2Program on the Global Environment, The University of Chicago, 5828 S. University Avenue, Pick 101, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
3Department of Natural and Applied Sciences, Bentley University, 175 Forest Street, Waltham, MA 02452, USA
4Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Room 1219, Boston, MA 02115, USA

Received 25 March 2015; Revised 20 June 2015; Accepted 25 June 2015

Academic Editor: Aleksei A. Koronovskii

Copyright © 2015 David Rehkopf et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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