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Disease Markers
Volume 35, Issue 1, Pages 3–9
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/510402
Review Article

Biomarkers in Schizophrenia: A Brief Conceptual Consideration

1School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia
2Neuroscience Research Australia, Hospital Road, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia
3Schizophrenia Research Institute, Darlinghurst, NSW 2010, Australia
4Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA 30912, USA

Received 1 April 2013; Accepted 16 April 2013

Academic Editor: Daniel Martins-de-Souza

Copyright © 2013 Cynthia S. Weickert et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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