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Disease Markers
Volume 35, Issue 1, Pages 11–21
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/748095
Review Article

Coding and Noncoding Gene Expression Biomarkers in Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia

1Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Functional Genomics Laboratory, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4260, USA
2Department of Psychiatry Research, Zucker Hillside Hospital, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, 75-59 263rd Street, Glen Oaks, NY 11004, USA
3The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA
4Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Belfer Room 403, Bronx, NY 10461, USA

Received 20 December 2012; Accepted 20 February 2013

Academic Editor: Daniel Martins-de-Souza

Copyright © 2013 Firoza Mamdani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Supplementary Material

Supplementary Table 1. There were 245 transcripts with statistically significant treatment response x medication x probeset interaction effects on expression after FDR step-up correction. The Affymetrix transcript ID, gene symbol, nominal p-values, FDR step-up p-value, and means for each group are shown in the table.

Supplementary Table 2. There were 210 transcripts with statistically significant Medication x Probeset interaction effects on expression after FDR step-up correction.

Supplementary Table 3. Input variables for Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of the 200 genes most significantly associated with treatment response x probeset effects on expression.

Supplementary Table 4. Input variables for Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of the 200 genes most significantly associated with treatment response x medication x probeset effects on expression.

  1. Supplementary Tables