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Disease Markers
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 126954, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/126954
Review Article

CC Chemokine Receptor 5: The Interface of Host Immunity and Cancer

Laboratory of Polymorphism and Application Study of DNA, Department of Pathological Sciences, Biological Sciences Center, State University of Londrina, Celso Garcia Cid highway, Pr 445, Km 380, 86057-970 Londrina, PR, Brazil

Received 27 June 2013; Accepted 30 October 2013; Published 19 January 2014

Academic Editor: Dinesh Kumbhare

Copyright © 2014 Carlos Eduardo Coral de Oliveira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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