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Disease Markers
Volume 2014, Article ID 192836, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/192836
Review Article

Renal Biopsy: Use of Biomarkers as a Tool for the Diagnosis of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

1Pathology Laboratory, Nephropathology Service, Federal University of Triângulo Mineiro, 38015-150 Uberaba, MG, Brazil
2Immunology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Triângulo Mineiro, 58051-900 Uberaba, MG, Brazil
3Human Immunology Research and Education Group, Technical Health School of UFPB, Federal University of Paraíba, 38025-180 João Pessoa, PB, Brazil

Received 26 November 2013; Revised 15 January 2014; Accepted 15 January 2014; Published 25 February 2014

Academic Editor: Vincent Sapin

Copyright © 2014 Crislaine Aparecida da Silva et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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