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Disease Markers
Volume 2014, Article ID 513158, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/513158
Review Article

Molecular Markers for Breast Cancer: Prediction on Tumor Behavior

Laboratory of Polymorphism and Application Study of DNA, Department of Pathological Sciences, Biological Sciences Center, State University of Londrina, 86057-970 Londrina, Brazil

Received 24 June 2013; Revised 4 October 2013; Accepted 12 November 2013; Published 28 January 2014

Academic Editor: Andreas Pich

Copyright © 2014 Bruna Karina Banin Hirata et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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