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Disease Markers
Volume 2014, Article ID 617150, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/617150
Research Article

MicroRNA-224 Suppresses Colorectal Cancer Cell Migration by Targeting Cdc42

1Institute of Medicine, Chung-Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan
2Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan
3Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei 116, Taiwan
4Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan
5PhD Program for Cancer Biology and Drug Discovery, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan
6Center for Translational Medicine, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan
7Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan

Received 7 November 2013; Revised 15 March 2014; Accepted 23 March 2014; Published 10 April 2014

Academic Editor: Valeria Barresi

Copyright © 2014 Tao-Wei Ke et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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