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Disease Markers
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 975178, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/975178
Review Article

Adiponectin as a Biomarker of Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women: Controversies

1Department of Functional Diagnostics and Physical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin, ul. Grudziądzka 31, 70-103 Szczecin, Poland
2Department of Physiology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Szczecin University, ul. Felczaka 3c, 71-412 Szczecin, Poland
3Institute of Physical Culture, Faculty of Physical Education, Health, and Tourism, Kazimierz Wielki University in Bydgoszcz, ul. Jana Karola Chodkiewicza 30, 85-064 Bydgoszcz, Poland
4Chair and Department of Biochemistry and Medical Chemistry, Pomeranian Medical University, al. Powstańców Wlkp. 72, 70-111 Szczecin, Poland

Received 30 June 2013; Revised 22 October 2013; Accepted 22 October 2013; Published 23 January 2014

Academic Editor: Ferdinando Mannello

Copyright © 2014 Anna Lubkowska et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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