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Disease Markers
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 194293, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/194293
Review Article

BRCA Genetic Screening in Middle Eastern and North African: Mutational Spectrum and Founder BRCA1 Mutation (c.798_799delTT) in North African

1Laboratoire de Recherche et de Biosécurité-P3, Hôpital Militaire d’Instruction Mohammed V, 10100 Rabat, Morocco
2Laboratoire de Biochimie-Immunologie, Faculté des Sciences, Université Mohammed V-Agdal, 10080 Rabat, Morocco
3Département d’Oncogénétique, Centre Jean Perrin, 58 rue Montalembert, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand, France
4Unité de Génétique, Hôpital Militaire d’Instruction Mohammed V, 10100 Rabat, Morocco
5Laboratoire d’Anatomopathologie, Hôpital Militaire d’Instruction Mohammed V, Equipe de Recherche en Pathologie Tumorale, Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie, 10100 Rabat, Morocco

Received 24 September 2014; Revised 16 January 2015; Accepted 26 January 2015

Academic Editor: Ralf Lichtinghagen

Copyright © 2015 Abdelilah Laraqui et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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