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Disease Markers
Volume 2015, Article ID 203136, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/203136
Clinical Study

The Difference between Growth Factor Expression after Single and Multiple Fractures: Preliminary Results in Human Fracture Healing

1Department of Trauma Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria
2Department of Internal Medicine, Gender Medicine Unit, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria

Received 30 April 2015; Revised 26 June 2015; Accepted 2 July 2015

Academic Editor: Silvia Persichilli

Copyright © 2015 Harald Binder et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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