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Disease Markers
Volume 2015, Article ID 479251, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/479251
Research Article

Blood Contamination in Saliva: Impact on the Measurement of Salivary Oxidative Stress Markers

1Institute of Molecular Biomedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Sasinkova 4, 811 08 Bratislava, Slovakia
2Department of Stomatology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Comenius University, Heydukova 10, 812 50 Bratislava, Slovakia
3Center for Molecular Medicine, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 831 01 Bratislava, Slovakia
4Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Sasinkova 4, 811 08 Bratislava, Slovakia
5Department of Molecular Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Mlynská Dolina, 842 15 Bratislava, Slovakia

Received 5 March 2015; Accepted 8 July 2015

Academic Editor: Kishore Chaudhry

Copyright © 2015 Natália Kamodyová et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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