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Disease Markers
Volume 2015, Article ID 542543, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/542543
Research Article

The Affymetrix DMET Plus Platform Reveals Unique Distribution of ADME-Related Variants in Ethnic Arabs

1King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh 11211, Saudi Arabia
2The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia

Received 7 October 2014; Revised 9 February 2015; Accepted 9 February 2015

Academic Editor: Helge Frieling

Copyright © 2015 Salma M. Wakil et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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