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Disease Markers
Volume 2016, Article ID 5236482, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5236482
Research Article

Human Hemochromatosis Protein (HFE) Immunoperoxidase Stain Highlights Choriocarcinoma within Mixed Germ Cell Tumors

Department of Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-3135, USA

Received 5 January 2016; Revised 10 February 2016; Accepted 17 February 2016

Academic Editor: Ralf Lichtinghagen

Copyright © 2016 Jesse L. Cox et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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