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Disease Markers
Volume 2016, Article ID 7806438, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7806438
Research Article

Galactose-Deficient IgA1 as a Candidate Urinary Polypeptide Marker of IgA Nephropathy?

1Division of Nephrology, Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan
2University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
3University of Parma, 43100 Parma, Italy
4University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN 38103, USA

Received 3 May 2016; Revised 23 June 2016; Accepted 12 July 2016

Academic Editor: Shih-Ping Hsu

Copyright © 2016 Hitoshi Suzuki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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