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Disease Markers
Volume 2016, Article ID 9602472, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9602472
Review Article

Proteomic Approaches to Biomarker Discovery in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

1Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Elias Emergency University Hospital, 011461 Bucharest, Romania
2Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, “Bagdasar Arseni” Clinical Emergency Hospital, 041915 Bucharest, Romania
3Department of Physiology, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 050474 Bucharest, Romania
4Department of Dermatology, “Prof. N. C. Paulescu” National Institute of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases, 020475 Bucharest, Romania
5Dermatology Research Laboratory, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 050474 Bucharest, Romania
6Department of Dermatology, Carol Medical Center, 020915 Bucharest, Romania

Received 8 April 2016; Revised 23 August 2016; Accepted 24 August 2016

Academic Editor: Simone Ribero

Copyright © 2016 Alexandra Ion et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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