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Disease Markers
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 1474560, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1474560
Research Article

Combined Genetic Biomarkers Confer Susceptibility to Risk of Urothelial Bladder Carcinoma in a Saudi Population

1Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Umm Al-Qura University, P.O. Box 57543, Mecca 21955, Saudi Arabia
2Department of Molecular Genetics, Medical Genetics Center, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566, Egypt
3Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Umm Al-Qura University, Mecca 21955, Saudi Arabia
4Department of Urology, King Abdullah Medical City Specialist Hospital, Mecca 21955, Saudi Arabia
5Division of Internal Medicine, Al-Noor Specialist Hospital, Mecca 21955, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence should be addressed to Nasser Attia Elhawary

Received 5 December 2016; Revised 21 January 2017; Accepted 5 February 2017; Published 27 February 2017

Academic Editor: Eric A. Singer

Copyright © 2017 Nasser Attia Elhawary et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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