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Disease Markers
Volume 2017, Article ID 9506527, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9506527
Research Article

A Promising Approach to Integrally Evaluate the Disease Outcome of Cerebral Ischemic Rats Based on Multiple-Biomarker Crosstalk

Center of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Xiaoquan Liu; nc.ude.upc@qxl

Received 26 November 2016; Revised 26 January 2017; Accepted 20 February 2017; Published 25 May 2017

Academic Editor: Tomás Sobrino

Copyright © 2017 Guimei Ran et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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