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Disease Markers
Volume 2019, Article ID 6852917, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/6852917
Research Article

Presence of Circulating miR-145, miR-155, and miR-382 in Exosomes Isolated from Serum of Breast Cancer Patients and Healthy Donors

1Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, College of Biological Sciences, Department of Cellular Biology and Genetics, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, Mexico
2Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA
3Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt
4Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, College of Biological Sciences, Laboratory of Immunology and Virology, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, Mexico
5Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, College of Physics and Mathematics, Research Center in Physics and Mathematic Sciences, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, Mexico
6Department of Gynecologic Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA
7Department of Center for RNAi and Non-coding RNA, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Diana Resendez-Perez; moc.liamg@zedneseraid

Received 30 July 2018; Accepted 23 October 2018; Published 12 February 2019

Academic Editor: Frank Tacke

Copyright © 2019 Vianey Gonzalez-Villasana et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

miR-145, miR-155, and miR-382 have been proposed as noninvasive biomarkers to distinguish breast cancer patients from healthy individuals. However, it is unknown if these three miRNAs are secreted by exosomes. Thus, we hypothesized that miR-145, miR-155, and miR-382 in breast cancer patients are present in exosomes. We isolated exosomes from serum of breast cancer patients and healthy donors, then we characterized them according to their shape, size, and exosome markers by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), and Western blot and determined the exosome concentration in all samples by NTA. Later, exosomal small RNA extraction was done to determine the expression levels of miR-145, miR-155, and miR-382 by qRT-PCR. We observed a round shape of exosomes with a mean size of 119.84 nm in breast cancer patients and 115.4 nm in healthy donors. All exosomes present the proteins CD63, Alix, Tsg, CD9, and CD81 commonly used as markers. Moreover, we found a significantly high concentration of exosomes in breast cancer patients with stages I, III, and IV compared to healthy donors. We detected miR-145, miR-155, and miR-382 in the exosomes isolated from serum of breast cancer patients and healthy donors. Our results show that the exosomes isolated from the serum of breast cancer patients and healthy donors contains miR-145, miR-155, and miR-382 but not in a selective manner in breast cancer patients. Moreover, our data support the association between exosome concentration and the presence of breast cancer, opening the possibility to study how miRNAs packaged into exosomes play a role in BC progression.