Table of Contents
Dataset Papers in Science
Volume 2013, Article ID 196492, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/196492
Dataset Paper

Molecular Data for the Sea Turtle Population in Brazil

Laboratório de Biodiversidade e Evolução Molecular (LBEM), Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Avenida Antônio Carlos 6627, 31270-010 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil

Received 3 June 2013; Accepted 20 June 2013

Academic Editors: G. Hill and S. Kleinsteuber

Copyright © 2013 Sibelle Torres Vilaça and Fabricio Rodrigues dos Santos. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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