Table of Contents
Dataset Papers in Science
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 823705, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/823705
Dataset Paper

Morphological Characterisation of Some Important Indian Garcinia Species

Indian Institute of Spices Research, Calicut, Kerala 673012, India

Received 20 June 2013; Accepted 29 July 2013; Published 23 April 2014

Academic Editors: P. J. Correia, D. Fangueiro, C. Machida, and S. Penna

This dataset has been dedicated to the public domain using the CC0 waiver.

Dataset http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/823705/dataset

Dataset

Dataset Item 1 (Table). Plant morphology of 9 Indian Garcinia species. The average plant height was calculated for the bearing plants. Garcinia shows a variation of height from 8 m to 25 m. The important feature of Garcinia plants is the copious exudates from wounded leaf and barks. The exudates vary from deep yellow to cream-yellow colour. Though red coloured blazes are a common feature in Garcinia, species like G. pedunculata, G. mangostana, and G. kydia do not produce blaze and G. subelliptica is found to have yellowish tender leaves.

  • Column 1: Species
  • Column 2: Height (m)
  • Column 3: Trunk Colour
  • Column 4: Trunk Texture
  • Column 5: Branches

Dataset Item 2 (Table). Leaf morphology of 9 Indian Garcinia species. Mature leaves were collected from corresponding trees and observed for morphological features such as dimensions, colour, texture, shape, and venations. Garcinia species are evergreen cauline plants, having opposite decussate foliar arrangement. Garcinia species have simple petiolate leaves. The petioles are so small in plants like G. indica, G. subelliptica and G. lanceaefolia that they almost appear to be sessile type leaves. Venation of the leaves is pinnate in all the cases, though the appearance of veins differs. In case of G. cowa, midvein raised abaxially; secondary veins are 12–18 pairs, near margin joining together; tertiary veins are conspicuous on both surfaces. In case of G. kydia, midvein slightly raised abaxially and secondary veins are visible.

  • Column 1: Species
  • Column 2: Crown
  • Column 3: Petiole
  • Column 4: Venation

Dataset Item 3 (Table). Leaf features of 9 Indian Garcinia species. Leaf margins of Garcinia leaves are entire except G. kydia, G. xanthochymus, and G. subelliptica. These three species have involutes leaf margins. Leaves show variation in shape and lamina size. Leaf shape varies a great from lanceolate to obovate and elliptic.

  • Column 1: Species
  • Column 2: Lamina Size (cm)
  • Column 3: Shape
  • Column 4: Apex
  • Column 5: Base
  • Column 6: Colour and Texture

Dataset Item 4 (Table). Flower morphology of 9 Indian Garcinia species. It is interesting to note that in north eastern region the flowering season is summer (April-June) while in Western Ghats it is spring (December–March). Garcinia shows two types of flowers, tetramerous (4-petaled) and pentamerous (5-petaled).

  • Column 1: Species
  • Column 2: Flower Nature
  • Column 3: Season
  • Column 4: Location

Dataset Item 5 (Table). Flower parts of 9 Indian Garcinia species. Garcinia flowers are mostly sessile (without flower stalk) except G. kydia which has pedicels of 4–7 mm length. Garcinia flowers except G. subelliptica are actinomorphic. Flower buds are round in shape and vary from 0.7 cm to 1 cm in diameter. All the flowers did not contain nectar. Garcinia also shows variation in flower colour.

  • Column 1: Species
  • Column 2: Colour
  • Column 3: Sepals
  • Column 4: Petals

Dataset Item 6 (Table). Flower parts of 9 Indian Garcinia species. The stamens of Garcinia flowers are epipetalous. Anthers are mostly sessile, 2 celled, and longitudinally dehiscent. Garcinia flowers are hypogenous.

  • Column 1: Species
  • Column 2: Stamens
  • Column 3: Stigma
  • Column 4: Ovary

Dataset Item 7 (Image). Flower of the Indian species Garcinia indica.

Dataset Item 8 (Image). Flower of the Indian species Garcinia gummi-gutta.

Dataset Item 9 (Image). Flower of the Indian species Garcinia cowa.

Dataset Item 10 (Image). Flower of the Indian species Garcinia kydia.

Dataset Item 11 (Image). Flower of the Indian species Garcinia lanceaefolia.

Dataset Item 12 (Image). Flower of the Indian species Garcinia pedunculata.

Dataset Item 13 (Image). Flower of the Indian species Garcinia subelliptica.

Dataset Item 14 (Image). Flower of the Indian species Garcinia xanthochymus.

Dataset Item 15 (Image). Flower of the Indian species Garcinia mangostana.

Dataset Item 16 (Table). Fruit morphology of 9 Indian Garcinia species. Garcinia fruits are fleshy berry with smooth fleshy pericarp with high diversity in shape and size. The size varies from 2 to 10 cm in diameter. Arils are acidic and juicy, and the acid content varies from species to species. Garcinia fruits possess an appetising acidic flavour. Fruit size was measured using a Vernier Caliper with horizontal length in diameter.

  • Column 1: Species
  • Column 2: Harvest
  • Column 3: Shape
  • Column 4: Size (cm)
  • Column 5: Colour
  • Column 6: Aril Colour

Dataset Item 17 (Table). Seed morphology of 9 Indian Garcinia species. Seed size is the average length of seeds measured using a Vernier calliper. The number of seeds varies from 1 to 8 in different species.

  • Column 1: Species
  • Column 2: Number of Seeds
  • Column 3: Seed Size (cm)
  • Column 4: Other Fruit Features

Dataset Item 18 (Image). Fruit of the Indian species Garcinia indica.

Dataset Item 19 (Image). Fruit of the Indian species Garcinia gummi-gutta.

Dataset Item 20 (Image). Fruit of the Indian species Garcinia cowa.

Dataset Item 21 (Image). Fruit of the Indian species Garcinia kydia.

Dataset Item 22 (Image). Fruit of the Indian species Garcinia lanceaefolia.

Dataset Item 23 (Image). Fruit of the Indian species Garcinia pedunculata.

Dataset Item 24 (Image). Fruit of the Indian species Garcinia subelliptica.

Dataset Item 25 (Image). Fruit of the Indian species Garcinia xanthochymus.

Dataset Item 26 (Image). Fruit of the Indian species Garcinia mangostana.