Table of Contents
Dataset Papers in Science
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 6276348, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6276348
Dataset Paper

Use of the CatWalk Gait Device to Assess Differences in Locomotion between Genders in Rats Inherently and following Spinal Cord Injury

1The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
2Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
3Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
4Department of Cell Biology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
5Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
6Neuroscience Program, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
7Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
8Bruce W. Carter Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Miami, FL 33136, USA

Received 9 May 2015; Revised 21 October 2015; Accepted 9 November 2015

Academic Editor: Fakhrul Islam

This dataset has been dedicated to the public domain using the CC0 waiver.

Dataset http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6276348/dataset

Dataset

Dataset Item 1 (Table). Results of ANCOVA, with age and weight as covariates, performed on the CatWalk data obtained at baseline from the animals, prior to SCI induction. Fifty-eight of the parameters revealed a significant difference () between males and females. Of these parameters, 27 were intensity measures for each of the four paws including maximum intensity, mean intensity, maximum contact maximum intensity, maximum intensity at the mean, minimum intensity, and maximum intensity at the 15 most intense pixels. The differences show that the paw prints of female animals exhibited a higher intensity than those of males. Many of the other gait parameters found to be significant between genders were based upon assessments of stand, including average stand for hind paws, average stand index, and stand for the right front, right hind, and left front paws. This indicates that the female animals maintained their paws for a longer duration on the glass walkway than the males, which matches the larger values obtained for paw intensity levels. The initial and terminal dual stance were significant for right front, left front, and right hind paws in accordance also with stand. On the other hand, many speed parameters such as body speed, average speed, and swing speed were significant, showing that the males were faster than females in crossing the runway (Table 1).

Dataset Item 2 (Table). Results of ANCOVA performed at three weeks after SCI with age, weight, and baseline as covariates. Forty-seven parameters were found to be significant, , between genders. Of these parameters, 27 were associated with the intensity of the footprint of each paw including mean intensity of the 15 most intense pixels, maximum intensity, mean intensity, minimum intensity, maximum contact maximum intensity, and maximum contact mean intensity. Maximum intensity at contact (%) was only significant for the hind limbs. Thus, females placed their paws with more force per unit area than males. In addition, females had higher swing and higher swing speed than males indicating that they may have better balance control during locomotion than males after SCI at this time point and were generating more force in stepping, causing their hind paws to be in the air longer. On the other hand, males had significantly higher body speeds than females for each of the paws (Table 2). Increased body speeds with the hind paws having less time in the air would indicate that the naturally stronger males are compensating more with their noninjured upper body strength in crossing due to greater paw deficits.

Dataset Item 3 (Table). Results of ANCOVA performed at 13 weeks after injury with age, weight, and baseline as covariates. At this time point, there were 28 parameters that showed a significant difference between genders. Females exhibited significantly higher scores in hind limb swing, single stance, stride length, and also support lateral and support diagonal. These are all indicators of greater hind limb motor function and coordination. While males were continuing to move faster, they were doing so by increased reaching of the forepaws as seen in print positions and increased weight distribution and force to the forepaws as seen by the ratio of intensity of hind paws to forepaws (1.05, females; 0.97, males). This compensation was also seen by significant differences between genders in couplings, which is a measurement of time between the placements of two paws in a step cycle, and duty cycle, which indicated that male rats were spending more time during a step cycle standing on the ground versus being able to generate the necessary force to push off the ground and have their paws in the air as long as the females (Table 3).