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Dermatology Research and Practice
Volume 2012, Article ID 259170, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/259170
Review Article

Targeting the Cellular Signaling: BRAF Inhibition and Beyond for the Treatment of Metastatic Malignant Melanoma

1Department of Dermatology, Institut Gustave Roussy, 114 rue Edouard Vaillant, 948005 Villejuif, France
2Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Boulevard de Waterloo, 121, 1000 Brussels, Belgium

Received 15 July 2011; Accepted 14 September 2011

Academic Editor: Gérald E. Piérard

Copyright © 2012 Felipe Ades and Otto Metzger-Filho. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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