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Dermatology Research and Practice
Volume 2012, Article ID 365230, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/365230
Research Article

Frequency of Genital Involvement in Women with Oral Lichen Planus in Southern Iran

1Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnosis, School of Dentistry, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Ghasrodasht Avenue, 71956-15878 Shiraz, Iran
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Zand Avenue, Imam Hossein Square, P.O. Box 71436-66184 Shiraz, Iran
3Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Zand Avenue, Imam Hossein Square, P.O. Box 71436-66184 Shiraz, Iran
4Department of Dermatology, Shiraz Skin Research Center (SSRC), School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Zand Avenue, Imam Hossein Square, P.O. Box 71436-66184 Shiraz, Iran

Received 30 December 2011; Revised 21 February 2012; Accepted 6 March 2012

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Argenziano

Copyright © 2012 M. Davarmanesh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Lichen Planus is a chronic mucocutaneous disease of immunological basis and unknown etiology. women with oral lichen planus may have concomitant manifestations in vulvovaginal areas. Objective. To determine the frequency and risk factors of genital involvement in a group of Iranian women affected by oral lichen planus. Methods. Thirty-six women with clinical and histopathological diagnosis of oral lichen planus were evaluated for demographic, historical, and clinical parameters of the oral disease. All the patients were referred for careful vulvovaginal examination, as well as histopathological assessment upon clinical indication. Results. Nineteen patients complained from genital symptoms but the number of women with the final diagnosis of genital lichen planus ( 𝑛 = 2 ) was too small to show any correlation with the parameters evaluated. Conclusion. In spite of low genital involvement possibly due to inadequate patient population, lack of follow-up visits, and contribution of genetic or ethnic factors, for conservative patient care, women with the oral lichen planus in particular those having some relevant genital symptoms, should preferably be referred for careful vulvovaginal examination. Multicenter cohort studies on women of different geographical regions or ethnicities who have genital lichen planus alone or in combination with other common sites are encouraged.