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Dermatology Research and Practice
Volume 2015, Article ID 310270, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/310270
Research Article

A Left-Sided Prevalence of Lentigo Maligna: A UK Based Observational Study and Review of the Evidence

1Canniesburn Plastic Surgery Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, UK
2Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull, UK

Received 24 December 2014; Accepted 14 February 2015

Academic Editor: Iris Zalaudek

Copyright © 2015 Mark Gorman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Skin cancer has been shown to present asymmetrically, prevalent on the left side of the body, more so in subtypes of cutaneous melanoma such as lentigo maligna. Biases have been linked to cumulative UV light exposure and automobile driving patterns. Though left-right ratios have previously correlated with the side men or women tend to position themselves or countries drive on, more recent trends indicate a consistent left-sided bias. To clarify reasons for changing trends, a review of the evidence base and LM’s laterality in a UK cohort (99 cases 2000–2011) was conducted for the first time. The strong correlation of left-sided excess, found in both genders (ratios 1.381–1.5,    0.841), is congruent with more recent findings. Though evidence indicates that driving position is no longer a risk factor for LM, due most likely to improved car window UV protection, it remains the most commonly attributed cause. Understanding phenomena such as UV lights “scatter effect” or that cumulative exposure may not be a significant risk factor helps rationalize older conclusions that would otherwise appear contradictory. The reasons for left-sided excess remain unclear but may be due to factors requiring further research such as the body’s anatomical/embryological asymmetry.