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Dermatology Research and Practice
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 5397319, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5397319
Research Article

Production of a Self-Aligned Scaffold, Free of Exogenous Material, from Dermal Fibroblasts Using the Self-Assembly Technique

1Centre LOEX de l’Université Laval, Génie Tissulaire et Médecine Régénératrice, LOEX du Centre de Recherche FRQS du Centre de Recherche de CHU de Québec, Axe Médecine Régénératrice, Aile-R Centre Hospitalier Affilié Universitaire de Québec, 1401 18e rue, Québec, QC, Canada G1J 1Z4
2Département de Chirurgie, Faculté de Médecine, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada G1K 7P4

Received 30 November 2015; Accepted 17 February 2016

Academic Editor: Lajos Kemény

Copyright © 2016 Stéphane Chabaud and Stéphane Bolduc. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Many pathologies of skin, especially ageing and cancer, involve modifications in the matrix alignment. Such tissue reorganization could have impact on cell behaviour and/or more global biological processes. Tissue engineering provides accurate study model by mimicking the skin and it allows the construction of versatile tridimensional models using human cells. It also avoids the use of animals, which gave sometimes nontranslatable results. Among the various techniques existing, the self-assembly method allows production of a near native skin, free of exogenous material. After cultivating human dermal fibroblasts in the presence of ascorbate during two weeks, a reseeding of these cells takes place after elevation of the resulting stroma on a permeable ring and culture pursued for another two weeks. This protocol induces a clear realignment of matrix fibres and cells parallel to the horizon. The thickness of this stretched reconstructed tissue is reduced compared to the stroma produced by the standard technique. Cell count is also reduced. In conclusion, a new, easy, and inexpensive method to produce aligned tissue free of exogenous material could be used for fundamental research applications in dermatology.