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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 326307, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/326307
Research Article

Improving the Management of Late-Life Depression in Primary Care: Barriers and Facilitators

1School of Social Work, McGill University, 3506 University Street, Room 300, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2A7
2Family Medicine, St. Mary's Hospital Center, McGill University, 3830 Lacombe Avenue, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1M5
3Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, St. Mary's Hospital Center, McGill University, 3830 Lacombe Avenue, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1M5
4Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Community Studies, St. Mary's Hospital Center, Faculty of Law, McGill University, 3830 Lacombe Avenue, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1M5
5Department of Medicine, McGill University, 3830 Lacombe Avenue, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1M5
6Division of Geriatric Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, St. Joseph's Health Centre, The University of Western Ontario, 850 Highbury Avenue, London, ON, Canada N6A 4G5
7School of Social Work, McGill University, 3506 University Street, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2A7

Received 24 January 2011; Accepted 1 March 2011

Academic Editor: Bernhard Baune

Copyright © 2011 Tamara Sussman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to elicit Canadian health professionals' views on the barriers to identifying and treating late-life depression in primary care settings and on the solutions felt to be most important and feasible to implement. A consensus development process was used to generate, rank, and discuss solutions. Twenty-three health professionals participated in the consensus process. Results were analysed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Participants generated 12 solutions. One solution, developing mechanisms to increase family physicians' awareness of resources, was highly ranked for importance and feasibility by most participants. Another solution, providing family physicians with direct mental health support, was highly ranked as important but not as feasible by most participants. Deliberations emphasized the importance of case specific, as needed support based on the principles of shared care. The results suggest that practitioners highly value collaborative care but question the feasibility of implementing these principles in current Canadian primary care contexts.