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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 156529, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/156529
Clinical Study

Neuromagnetic Indication of Dysfunctional Emotion Regulation in Affective Disorders

1Department of Psychology, Zukunftskolleg, University of Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz, Germany
2Department of Psychology, University of Delaware, Newark, 19716 DE, USA

Received 29 September 2011; Revised 10 January 2012; Accepted 24 January 2012

Academic Editor: Bernard Sabbe

Copyright © 2012 Christian Pietrek et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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