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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 267820, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/267820
Research Article

Prospective Associations between Religiousness/Spirituality and Depression and Mediating Effects of Forgiveness in a Nationally Representative Sample of United States Adults

1Department of Psychology, Luther College, 700 College Dr., Decorah, IA 52101, USA
2Department of Society, Human Development, and Health, Harvard University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3Department of African and African American Studies, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
4Department of Sociology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA

Received 3 February 2012; Revised 23 March 2012; Accepted 23 March 2012

Academic Editor: Harold G. Koenig

Copyright © 2012 Loren L. Toussaint et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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