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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 970194, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/970194
Review Article

Mental Health Services Required after Disasters: Learning from the Lasting Effects of Disasters

1Department of Psychiatry, Centre for Traumatic Stress Studies, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5000, Australia
2Mental Health Strategy, Welsh Institute for Health and Social Care, University of Glamorgan and Ty Bryn, St Cadoc’s Hospital, Aneurin Bevan Health Board, NHS Wales, Lodge Road, Caerleon, Gwent NP 18 3XQ, UK

Received 19 December 2011; Accepted 30 April 2012

Academic Editor: Rachel Yehuda

Copyright © 2012 A. C. McFarlane and Richard Williams. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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