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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2014, Article ID 790457, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/790457
Research Article

Participating in Online Mental Health Interventions: Who Is Most Likely to Sign Up and Why?

1Centre for Mental Health Research, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
2Centre for Applied Psychology, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia

Received 12 December 2013; Revised 23 February 2014; Accepted 11 March 2014; Published 2 April 2014

Academic Editor: Frans G. Zitman

Copyright © 2014 Dimity A. Crisp and Kathleen M. Griffiths. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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