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Depression Research and Treatment
Volume 2015, Article ID 397076, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/397076
Research Article

Illness Attitudes Associated with Seasonal Depressive Symptoms: An Examination Using a Newly Developed Implicit Measure

Department of Psychology, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616, USA

Received 24 June 2015; Accepted 24 November 2015

Academic Editor: Wai-Kwong Tang

Copyright © 2015 Katherine Meyers and Michael A. Young. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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