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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 185034, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/185034
Research Article

The Nonpenetrating Telescopic Sham Needle May Blind Patients with Different Characteristics and Experiences When Treated by Several Therapists

1Division of Nursing Science, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, 581 85 Linköping, Sweden
2The Swedish Institute for Health Sciences (Vårdal Institute), Lund University, 221 00 Lund, Sweden
3Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Osher Centrum, Karolinska Institute, Retzius väg 8, plan 3, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
4Department of Oncology, Lund University Hospital, 221 85 Lund, Sweden
5Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Linköping University, 581 85 Linköping, Sweden
6Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
7Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy, 513 45 Gothenburg, Sweden
8Centre of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology, Department of Oncology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden

Received 1 December 2010; Revised 10 February 2011; Accepted 10 March 2011

Copyright © 2011 Anna Enblom et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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