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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 362517, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep139
Original Article

Homeopathic Doses of Gelsemium sempervirens Improve the Behavior of Mice in Response to Novel Environments

1Department of Morphological Biomedical Sciences (Chemistry and Microscopy Section), University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy
2Department of Medicine and Public Health (Biomedical Statistics Section), University of Verona, Verona, Italy
3Department of Medicine and Public Health (Medical Pharmacology Section), University of Verona, Verona, Italy

Received 24 April 2009; Accepted 17 August 2009

Copyright © 2011 Paolo Bellavite et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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