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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 485945, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/neq009
Original Article

Is Sham Laser a Valid Control for Acupuncture Trials?

1Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Department of Anaesthesiology, University of Munich, Pettenkoferstraße 8A, 80336 Munich, Germany
2Department of Pediatrics, Staedtisches Klinikum City of Munich/Harlaching, Germany
3Physical Medicine, Rehabilitation and Prevention, Lindwurmstr, Munich, Germany

Received 23 November 2009; Accepted 18 January 2010

Copyright © 2011 Dominik Irnich et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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