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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 524349, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep081
Original Article

Intestinal Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Baccharis dracunculifolia in the Trinitrobenzenesulphonic Acid Model of Rat Colitis

1Laboratory of Phytomedicines, Department of Pharmacology, Instituto de Biociências, São Paulo State University–UNESP, Botucatu 18.618-000, São Paulo, Brazil
2Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto 14040-903, São Paulo, Brazil

Received 13 January 2009; Accepted 28 May 2009

Copyright © 2011 Sílvia Helena Cestari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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