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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 734785, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep076
Original Article

Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid from Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata) Mitigates 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate-Induced Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Responses of Tumor Promotion Cascade in Mouse Skin

1Department of Medical Elementology and Toxicology, Hamdard University, New Delhi 110062, India
2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA
3Department of Neurophysiology, Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Brenneckestrasse 6, Magdeburg D-39118, Germany

Received 20 January 2009; Accepted 2 June 2009

Copyright © 2011 Shakilur Rahman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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