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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 827979, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep094
Original Article

Utilization of Western Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine Services by Physicians and Their Relatives: The Role of Training Background

1Institute of Hospital and Health Care Administration, School of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan
2Institute of Public Health & Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan
3Taiwan's Bureau of National Health Insurance, College of Social Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
4Department of Social Work, College of Social Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

Received 19 March 2009; Accepted 25 June 2009

Copyright © 2011 Nicole Huang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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