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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 913898, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep229
Original Article

Curdione Plays an Important Role in the Inhibitory Effect of Curcuma aromatica on CYP3A4 in Caco-2 Cells

1Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mukogawa Women's University, 9-11-68 koushien, Nishinomiya City, Hyogo, Japan
2Division of Pharmacognosy, Department of Medicinal Resources, Institute of Natural Medicine, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama City, Toyama, Japan
3Department of Medicinal Resources, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Science, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita City, Osaka, Japan

Received 6 April 2009; Accepted 1 December 2009

Copyright © 2011 Xiao-Long Hou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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