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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 932407, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep049
Commentary

Is Placebo Acupuncture What It Is Intended to Be?

1Foundation for Acupuncture and Alternative Biological Treatment Methods, Sabbatsbergs Hospital, Sweden
2Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
3Foundation for Acupuncture and Alternative Biological Treatment Methods, Sabbatsbergs Hospital, Sweden
4Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

Received 19 October 2008; Accepted 7 May 2009

Copyright © 2011 Thomas Lundeberg et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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