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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2011, Article ID 952031, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep241
Original Article

Anti-Obesity and Anti-Diabetic Effects of Acacia Polyphenol in Obese Diabetic KKAy Mice Fed High-Fat Diet

Department of Clinical Pharmacokinetics, Hoshi University, Tokyo, Japan

Received 13 October 2009; Accepted 12 December 2009

Copyright © 2011 Nobutomo Ikarashi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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