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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 414536, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/414536
Research Article

Therapeutic Effect of Yi-Chi-Tsung-Ming-Tang on Amyloid β1−40-Induced Alzheimer's Disease-Like Phenotype via an Increase of Acetylcholine and Decrease of Amyloid β

1Department of Neurology, Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan
2Graduate Institute of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40001, Taiwan
3Department of Nursing, College of Medicine & Nursing, HungKuang University (HKU), Taichung 40001, Taiwan
4School of Chinese Pharmaceutical Sciences and Chinese Medicine Resources, College of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung 40001, Taiwan
5School of Health, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taichung 40401, Taiwan
6Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40001, Taiwan
7Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40001, Taiwan

Received 13 March 2012; Accepted 23 April 2012

Academic Editor: Paul Siu-Po Ip

Copyright © 2012 Chung-Hsin Yeh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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