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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 431279, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/431279
Research Article

Clinical Studies on Treatment of Earthquake-Caused Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Using Electroacupuncture

1Department of Rehabilitation, Chengdu Military General Hospital, No.270, Road Rongdu, Jinniu District, Chengdu 610083, China
2Acupuncture and Tuina College, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chengdu 610075, China

Received 11 May 2012; Revised 29 July 2012; Accepted 29 July 2012

Academic Editor: Gerhard Litscher

Copyright © 2012 Yu Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture in 138 patients with earthquake-caused PTSD using Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs). 138 cases enrolled were randomly assigned to an electro-acupuncture group and a paroxetine group. The electro-acupuncture group was treated by scalp electro-acupuncture on Baihui (GV 20), Sishencong (EX-HN 1), Shenting (GV 24), and Fengchi (GB 20), and the paroxetine group was treated with simple oral administration of paroxetine. The efficacy and safety of the electro-acupuncture on treatment of 69 PTSD patients were evaluated using Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA), and Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale (TESS) according to clinical data. The total scores of CAPS, HAMD, and HAMA in the two groups after treatment showed significant efficacy compared to those before treatment. The comparison of reduction in the scores of CAPS, HAMD, and HAMA between the two groups suggested that the efficacy in the treated group was better than that in the paroxetine group. The present study suggested that the electro-acupuncture and paroxetine groups have significant changes in test PTSD, but the electro-acupuncture 2 group was more significant.