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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 743075, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/743075
Research Article

Angelicae Dahuricae Radix Inhibits Dust Mite Extract-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in NC/Nga Mice

Herbal Medicine EBM Research Center, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, 483 Expo-ro, Daejeon Yuseong-gu, 305-811, Republic of Korea

Received 8 July 2011; Revised 5 October 2011; Accepted 20 October 2011

Academic Editor: Yoshiyuki Kimura

Copyright © 2012 Hoyoung Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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