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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 954374, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/954374
Research Article

Testing Homeopathy in Mouse Emotional Response Models: Pooled Data Analysis of Two Series of Studies

1Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy
2Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Verona, 37134 Verona, Italy

Received 21 November 2011; Accepted 29 January 2012

Academic Editor: Carlo Ventura

Copyright © 2012 Paolo Bellavite et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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