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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 960128, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/960128
Research Article

Salvianolic Acid B Inhibits ERK and p38 MAPK Signaling in TGF- 1-Stimulated Human Hepatic Stellate Cell Line (LX-2) via Distinct Pathways

Zhigang Lv1,2,3 and Lieming Xu1,2,4,5

1Shuguang Hospital, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China
2Institute of Liver Diseases, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China
3Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021, USA
4Key Laboratory of Liver and Kidney Diseases, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200444, China
5E-Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine Internal Medicine in Shanghai University, Shanghai 201203, China

Received 15 December 2010; Revised 13 April 2011; Accepted 22 May 2011

Academic Editor: Xiu-Min Li

Copyright © 2012 Zhigang Lv and Lieming Xu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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