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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 979213, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/979213
Review Article

Cancer-Related Stress and Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Review

James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Rochester Medical Center, Saunders Research Building, 265 Crittenden Boulevard, Office 2.224, Box CU 420658, Rochester, NY 14642, USA

Received 2 January 2012; Accepted 1 June 2012

Academic Editor: Alyson Huntley

Copyright © 2012 Kavita D. Chandwani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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