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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 107380, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/107380
Research Article

Enhanced Antidepressant-Like Effects of Electroacupuncture Combined with Citalopram in a Rat Model of Depression

1Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, 5 Ankang Alley, Beijing 100088, China
2School of Arts and Law, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China
3Department of Physiology and Neurobiology, Capital Medical University, Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Disease of Education Ministry, 10 You An Men, Beijing 100069, China

Received 16 February 2013; Revised 13 April 2013; Accepted 22 April 2013

Academic Editor: Vitaly Napadow

Copyright © 2013 Jian Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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