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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 127271, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/127271
Research Article

Multivariate Granger Causality Analysis of Acupuncture Effects in Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients: An fMRI Study

1Baoan Hospital, Southern Medical University, Shenzhen 518101, China
2The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, China
3The First Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510405, China
4The First Affiliated Hospital, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin 300193, China

Received 21 February 2013; Revised 11 April 2013; Accepted 2 June 2013

Academic Editor: Baixiao Zhao

Copyright © 2013 Shangjie Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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